Sledge Lit and Me (Part 2)

Sledge-LitKick off by reading Sledge-Lit and Me (Part 1)

Following the morning’s panel discussion, I ran a workshop on Worldbuilding. The truth is, I could very easily write a year-long course on this, so squeezing it into a session of just under an hour was not an easy task.

Throwing in a group discussion exercise, and a writing exercise meant that I wasn’t able to time it perfectly, but I had a plan B up my sleeve in case I ran out of time, and a plan C in case my script fell short on time. Which it did. So I simply gave out the handouts I’d prepared, and we started going through the extra topics on that. I think it was pretty seamless.

Worldbuilding is something I can happily nerd out over completely, and this workshop allowed me to indulge that. It was exciting to share my passion, and to get other people excited over something I love. And best of all, as one of the attendees said, my “excitement was infectious”. I couldn’t ask for anything more, really.

All of the attendees were great: creative, engaged, and keen to get involved. I couldn’t have hoped for a better group. The atmosphere in that room was electric, and we all went out of there absolutely buzzing with inspiration and ideas.

The feedback I’ve had has been amazing, and made it all totally worthwhile. Really hope I get the opportunity to do more of this.

Edge-Lit 3 Workshop Feedback 1Edge-Lit 3 Workshop Feedback 2Edge-Lit 3 Workshop Feedback 3Edge-Lit 3 Workshop Feedback 4

Sledge-Lit and Me (Part 1)

Sledge-LitSaturday 25th November saw the third instalment of Sledge-Lit, the Christmas edition of Derby’s bi-annual science fiction, fantasy, and horror literary convention. I’ve been attending the events since 2014, but this one was my first time attending as a guest author.

The thing I’ve always found about these events, is that every single time I leave them I am filled with inspiration, enthusiasm, and ideas. And this summer’s Edge-Lit left me with an idea for a workshop. So I emailed Alex, who organises the events, nervously awaited a reply, and that was it, I was added to the line up.

Well, there was just one more thing.

Alex asked me if I’d like to also be on a panel discussion. I said yes straight away (well, straight after I got my husband to tell me to stop being so silly over it all). If I’d given myself time to think about it, I’d have probably wimped out. My whole background is in theatre, I practically grew up on the stage. But I have always, and still do, suffer from terrible stage fright. And there’s one huge difference between being on stage, and being on a panel. On a panel, I have to be myself. There’s no costume, no script, no character to hide behind.

To my great relief, I was sent the panel questions beforehand, giving me a chance to, in my own time, construct answers to them. I brought my prompt sheet with me, because my stage fright does tend to shut my brain down completely. Of course, what I couldn’t prepare for was when the questions were opened up to the audience.

Sledge-Lit 3 Panel Discussion

Although I was shaking the whole way through, I was put at total ease by both my co-panellists, and the audience, and I managed to coherently answer the questions thrown at me. That’s why I love these events: Edge-Lit is a small, tight-knit, friendly, and supportive community of people that only want to see each other succeed.

Now read Sledge-Lit and Me (Part 2), where I talk about my worldbuilding workshop.